THE PROOF OF THE TRUTH

The Proof Of The Truth
Is In The Proving Of The Truth
It’s in the actual experience, and not in the words

The Buddha’s teachings can be described in one word – recognition (…or awareness…or perception…or consciousness…or seeing…they’re all the same).

We hear of the Four Noble Truths and think “Nice. Now can we move onto the real stuff!”. So we become complicated mathematicians, trying to add to our knowledge while subtracting at the same time: this creates a multiplicity of confusion, and divides us through different uses of language. This actually works against our endeavour to realise the purity of the truth!

If we want the truth dressed up,
there are those who will dress it up for us.

The four noble truths are the acknowledgment that we suffer, the cause of that suffering, the method to resolve that cause and the dissolution of suffering.

They also illustrate the unity of the relative and the absolute realities; from one we realise the other. They go hand in hand. Dissatisfaction reveals innate knowingness.

In addition, they reveal that the negative emotions are, in essence, the wisdoms. Recognising and acknowledging a negative emotion is innate knowingness.

The four noble truths are the whole the mechanism: they are the recognition of the illusory mud obscuring the Buddha.

The Four Noble Truths
(or the four recognitions)

1. Recognise suffering/dissatisfaction.

2. Recognise the cause for that suffering/dissatisfaction.

3. Recognise the principles that untie suffering/dissatisfaction.

4. Having recognised the principles, watch the snake untie itself.

We do nothing, but recognise.

In more detail:

1.
Dissatisfaction implies that we naturally know something isn’t right. There is an innate knowingness, but pure being is constantly distracted. This creates unhappiness.

2.
We know there is a cause for this unhappiness but are confused about what this is. Through the teachings, we learn that we are holding onto a mistaken self identity. This is the cause of our dissatisfaction.

3.
Knowing we are not clear, we seek clarity. We find a complete system to dissolve all distractions that obscure that clarity. That system is recognition.

4.
When we are convinced, through testing and recognition, that the system is sound, we resolve to give up…and the snake unties itself.

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