BEING FOOLPROOF

Being Foolproof
Incapable of going wrong.

It is the antidote that is the problem!

As long as we feel that we are missing something, we will be fooled.
What is it that is complete, and has no parts to fail?

Emptiness.

Emptiness has no inside or outside, no top or bottom. Emptiness is the clarity of perfect consciousness that has no needs. Having no needs, it cannot be fooled into needing something. Neediness is the normal human conditioning and is the reason we are being fooled, time after time.

Applying any method* is merely an antidote and not a permanent solution, because the situation will arise again and again. Anger arises and we apply compassion: this merely covers up the anger, and keeps us in perpetual self madness because the anger is still present underneath.

It is pure consciousness that is foolproof, as it perceives everything without bias. The moment we recognise any emotion is the moment of detachment because there is a brightening of the mind. In that moment, anger is wisdom, from which true compassion expands. If we modify, we could be applying platitudes and sound bites which hide the reality of feeling the discomfort and sadness within the raw situation. In experiencing freedom, there is slight unease because it is glaring obvious that we have been holding on to something.

*There are lots of methods!

Buddhist traditions from Wikipedia:

Sthaviravāda

Pudgalavāda

Sarvāstivāda

Vibhajyavāda

Theravāda

Theravāda subschools:

Mahīśāsaka

Dharmaguptaka

Kāśyapīya

Vatsīputrīya later name: Saṃmitīya

Dharmottarīya

Bhadrayānīya

Sannāgarika

Mūlasarvāstivāda

Sautrāntika

Mahāsāṃghika

Ekavyahārikas

Lokottaravāda

Golulika

Bahuśrutīya

Prajñaptivāda

Cetiyavāda

Caitika

Apara Śaila

Uttara Śaila

The following lists the twenty sects described as Hīnayāna, as the classification is understood in some Mahāyāna texts:

Sthaviravāda split into the 11 sects:

Sarvāstivādin

Haimavata

Vatsīputrīya

Dharmottara

Bhadrayānīya

Sammitiya

Channagirika

Mahīśāsaka

Dharmaguptaka

Kāśyapīya

Sautrāntika

Sthaviravāda

Haimavata

Sarvāstivādin

Vatsīputrīya

Dharmottara

Bhadrayānīya

Sammitiya

Channagirika

Mahīśāsaka

Dharmaguptaka

Kāśyapīya

Sautrāntika

Mahāsāṃghika split into 9 sects:

Ekavyahārika

Lokottaravādin

Kaukkutika

Bahuśrutīya

Prajñaptivāda

Caitika

Aparaśaila

Uttaraśaila.

Mahasanghika

Ekavyahārika

Caitika

Lokottaravādin

Aparaśaila

Kaukkutika

Uttaraśaila

Bahuśrutīya

Prajñaptivāda

Influences on East Asian schools

The following later schools used the vinaya of the Dharmaguptaka:

Chinese Buddhism, especially the Vinaya School

Korean Buddhism, especially Gyeyul

Vietnamese Buddhism

Japanese Ritsu

The following involve philosophical influence:

The Japanese Jojitsu is considered by some an offshoot of Sautrāntika; others consider it to be derived from Bahuśrutīya

The Chinese/Japanese Kusha school is considered an offshoot of Sarvāstivāda, influenced by Vasubandhu.

Theravāda subschools

The different schools in Theravāda often emphasize different aspects (or parts) of the Pāli canon and the later commentaries, or differ in the focus on and recommended way of practice. There are also significant differences in strictness or interpretation of the vinaya.

Bangladesh:

Sangharaj Nikaya

Mahasthabir Nikaya

Burma:

Thudhamma Nikaya

Vipassanā tradition of Mahasi Sayadaw and disciples

Shwegyin Nikaya

Dvaya Nikaya or Dvara Nikaya (see Mendelson, Sangha and State in Burma, Cornell University Press, Ithaca, New York, 1975)

Hngettwin Nikaya

Sri Lanka:

Siam Nikaya

Waturawila (or Mahavihara Vamshika Shyamopali Vanavasa Nikaya)

Amarapura Nikaya

Kanduboda (or Swejin Nikaya)

Tapovana (or Kalyanavamsa)

Ramañña Nikaya

Sri Kalyani Yogasrama Samstha (or ‘Galduwa Tradition’)

Delduwa

forest nikaya

Thailand

Maha Nikaya

Dhammakaya Movement

Mahasati meditation (mindfulness meditation)

Thammayut Nikaya

Thai Forest Tradition

Tradition of Ajahn Chah

Vipassana movement

Tantric Theravada Mahāyāna schools

Thousand-armed Avalokiteśvara Bodhisattva. Guanyin Nunnery, Anhui, China

Indian Buddhism

Mādhyamaka

Prāsangika

Svātantrika

Yogācāra

Chinese Buddhism

Vinaya school[18]

Jingtu (Pure Land)

Satyasiddhi (Historical)

Abhidharmakośa (Historical)

Daśabhūmikā (absorbed into Huayan)

Tiantai

Huayan (Avataṃsaka)

Chan (Zen)

Tangmi (Esoteric)

Sanlun (Mādhyamaka)

Weishi (Yogācāra)

Korean Buddhism

Tongbulgyo (Interpenetrated Buddhism – including Jeongto, or Pure Land)

Gyeyul (Vinaya school)

Cheontae (Tiantai)

Hwaeom (Avataṃsaka)

Seon (Zen)

Jingak (Esoteric)

Samnon (Mādhyamaka)

Beopsang (Yogācāra)

Yeolban (Nirvana school)

Wonbulgyo (Korean Reformed Buddhism)

Vietnamese Buddhism

Tịnh Độ (Pure Land)

Thiền (Zen)

Trúc Lâm (Syncretic)

Unified Buddhist Church (Engaged Buddhism)

Hòa Hảo (Reformist)

Japanese Buddhism

Pure Land

Jōdo-shū

Jōdo Shinshū

Ji-shū

Yūzū-nembutsu-shū

Risshū school (Vinaya school)

Jojitsu (Satyasiddhi – historical)

Kusha (Abhidharmakośa – historical)

Sanron (Mādhyamaka – historical)

Hossō (Yogācāra)

Kegon (Avatamsaka)

Japanese esoteric Buddhism

Tendai (Tiantai)

Shingon

Shinnyo-en

Shugendo (Syncretic)

Zen

Rinzai

Sōtō

Ōbaku

Fuke-shū (Historical)

Nichiren Buddhism

Nichiren Shū

Honmon Butsuryū-shū

Kempon Hokke

Nichiren Shōshū

Subcategorised according to predecessors:

Tibetan Buddhism

Nyingma

New Bön (synthesis of Yungdrung Bön and Nyingmapa)

Kadam (Historical)

Gelug

New Kadampa Tradition

Sakya

Ngor-pa

Tsar-pa

Jonang

Kagyu:

Shangpa Kagyu

Marpa Kagyu:

Rechung Kagyu

Dagpo Kagyu:

Karma Kagyu (or Kamtshang Kagyu)

Tsalpa Kagyu

Baram Kagyu

Pagtru Kagyu (or Phagmo Drugpa Kagyu):

Taklung Kagyu

Trophu Kagyu

Drukpa Kagyu

Martsang Kagyu

Yerpa Kagyu

Yazang Kagyu

Shugseb Kagyu

Drikung Kagyu

Rime movement (ecumenical movement)

Newar Buddhism

Tangmi Buddhism

Japanese Mikkyo

Shingon

Tendai (derived from Tiantai but added tantric practices)

Shinnyo-en

Shugendo (Syncretized with Shinto, Taoism, and shamanism)

New Buddhist movements[edit]

Dalit Buddhist movement

Dhammakaya Movement

Diamond Way

Engaged Buddhism

Kenshōkai

New Kadampa Tradition

Nipponzan Myōhōji

Reiyūkai

Risshō Kōsei Kai

Shambhala Buddhism

Share International

Shōshinkai

Sōka Gakkai

Triratna Buddhist Community

True Buddha School

Vipassana movement

Won Buddhism

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2 Responses to BEING FOOLPROOF

  1. crestedduck says:

    Boy oh boy that list seems like a awful lot of division…..a whole lot of divide the mind/people and conquer the mind/people !

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